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Linux Foundation plans to support sustainable open source with new initiatives

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Linux Foundation initiatives for sustainable open source developments

The Linux Foundation has announced a bunch of new initiatives to help bring the growth and sustainability of open source. At Open Source Summit North America, Linux Foundation Executive Director Jim Zemlin highlighted the latest move.

“The biggest bottleneck to the growth of many open source projects is that organisations don’t know how to be a participant in open source. If we can train organsations to become leaders in open source, we will move the needle on the number of developers participating in these projects,” said Zemlin.

First in the series of initiatives is open source guides that are specifically designed to let them understand the way to participate in open source. The Linux Foundation has partnered with the TODO Group of professional open source managers to build the guides appropriately.

In addition to guides, the Linux Foundation has developed Community Health Analytics for Open Source Software as a new Linux Foundation project that is aimed to build a platform for measuring and analysing open source projects. There is also the Core Infrastructure Initiative (CII) that applies badges on projects that mandate security projects. The badging programme by the non-profit organisation has received registrations from more than 1,000 projects, and 100 of them have achieved a badge since its launch in May last year.

The Linux Foundation has additionally brought the Kubernetes Certified Service Provider initiative that helps organisations with the industry support. The training initiative looks for organisations with more than three certified Kubernetes administrators to transform them into a Kubernetes service provider and help grow the project’s ecosystem.

“I want to encourage you to get involved in one our new initiatives, or any one of our other more than 75 open source projects here at the Linux Foundation,” Zemlin wrote in a blog post.

As per some statistics provided by the Linux Foundation, more than 4,300 developers are contributing to the Linux kernel — with a total of 10,000 lines of code on a daily basis. Moreover, there are 64 million open source projects that would be benefited through the newly designed initiatives.