Know How Customers Use a Website with Clarity, an open-source analytics tool

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The tool works on any HTML webpage (desktop or mobile) after adding a small piece of JavaScript to the website. 

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Microsoft’s search engine Bing has announced the beta release of Clarity, a new analytics product that lets site owners see how users interact on their websites.

The free, open-source tool will help site owners decide on what exactly they should change and improve on their sites to optimize conversion, engagement and retention.

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Clarity allows site owners to replay users’ interactions such as mouse movements, touch gestures and click events. By doing so, webmasters can get a deeper understanding of user behavior, their pain points and requirements to build a compelling and user-friendly website.

It also has other typical functionalities such as heatmap and scroll map.

Clarity respects users’ privacy by using text masking. Text is masked by default in the instrumentation layer and is not uploaded.

How to use clarity

In a blog, Clarity team claims that web sites of all sizes can benefit from the tool.

The tool works on any HTML webpage (desktop or mobile) after adding a small piece of JavaScript to the website.

Site owners can avail the tool using their Microsoft Accounts. As it is still in beta, when you create a new project, it will be added to the waitlist. Once your project is approved for onboarding, you can get the code and add to your website to use Clarity.

Clarity respects users’ privacy by using text masking. Text is masked by default in the instrumentation layer and is not uploaded.

Clarity yields positive results

One early tester of Clarity is food blog Cook with Manali. While using Clarity, the site owner noticed that a lot of users were abandoning the page before reaching the bottom, which has important information about the recipe.

After replaying sessions of users who abandoned her blog, she could figure out that those who were only interested in the recipe, which is at the bottom, scrolled through the long post and gave up midway and abandoned the page.

Based on that finding, she added a “Jump to recipe” button at the top of the page, giving users a faster path to the recipe content.

The Clarity team has also released the JavaScript library which instruments pages to help understand user behaviour on websites on GitHub.

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