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For U & Me

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Is It a Bird? Is It a Plane? No! It’s PC-BSD!

The FreeBSD projects boast of the most stable operating system kernel in the world. Created from the University of Berkeley’s BSD4.4Lite sources, it’s a valid claim. And when such a kernel is blended with one of the most comfortable userlands of the world, magic happens. Ladies and gentlemen, we bring to you PC-BSD, a perfect fusion of BSD’s kernel and GNU’s userland—an operating system that’s aesthetic, pleasurable and complete in every aspect, and which has been designed keeping the assassination of Microsoft in mind.

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Bob Young: Because of the much lower cost, open source should do very well in this economy

Bob Young has played a key role in building Linux into a household name. In 1993, with Mark Ewing, he co-founded Red Hat and was the CEO of the company for several years. After leaving Red Hat, he started a print-on-demand website called Lulu, where content creators can sell their books, comics, movies, or any other content that can be digitised and sold over the Web. Young also owns the Hamilton Tiger-Cats, a Canadian football league franchise that he purchased in 2003. In this interview with LFY, he talks about Lulu.

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A Peek Into the WWW, Courtesy MozillaCamp

Delhi’s first unconference on Mozilla technologies was a grand event with about a 100 campers who came together to share some Mozilla love on February 10. It was an event that attracted technologists and students, with Mozilla’s Seth Bindernagel and Arun Ranganathan around to discuss the future of the Web.

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The GNUnified Experience!

Here’s a report on an event that touched on almost all aspects of open source—from installations to kernel programming and scripting, from OpenOffice.org to Bash and Perl, from Ext4 file system to SCSI, and from scientific computing to network security.

For U & Me
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Slax 6: Slacks Off To You!

First, there was Slackware. And then there was Slax. As the similarity between the names suggests, Slax is actually a size-optimised (well, from 1.9 GB worth of installation files to a 190.1MB LiveCD) version of Slackware that’s meant for use as a Live CD and LiveUSB.