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Docker Enterprise and Community Editions set pitch for containers

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Docker Enterprise, Community Edition

With the sudden increase in containers, Docker has announced its new versioning and release cycle. The new versioning channels will address the long-standing complaints about Docker’s rapid development and are targeting two different versions, one for developers only and the other one for DevOps professionals.

The basic editions will include Docker Enterprise Edition (EE) and Docker Community Edition. While the enterprise-centric version will help enterprises run Docker environment in public cloud as well as certified private infrastructure, the open source CE (community edition) is aimed at the users who are using the service for personal consumption.

DevOps users on Docker EE will continue to get software revisions under enterprise edition. However, the Docker CE users will have two channels — a monthly release will bring most up-to-date features, whereas the quarterly release channel will bring only important updates for operation’s users. The EE users will also receive quarterly releases that will bring all major and minor changes.

“Both Docker CE and EE are available on a wide range of popular operating systems and cloud infrastructure. This gives developers, DevOps teams and enterprises the freedom to run Docker and Docker apps on their favourite infrastructure without risk of lock-in,” said Michael Friis, a product manager at Docker, in a statement.

The Docker EE comes in three different SKUs, namely EE Basic, EE Standard and EE Advance. The EE Advance SKU brings image security scanning and continuous vulnerability monitoring.

Development emerges on users’ request

The idea of segmenting Docker is to segregate different releases. It was proposed after multiple requests for users who found it tough to keep up with the updates.

Docker is aiming to help both developers and operations professionals to help find best suitable software for their needs. This would ultimately expand the consumption of containers.